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  • Asthamangala (8 set per unit)

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    The eight favorable symbols are called as Astamangala in Sanskrit and bkra-shis rtags-brgyad in Tibet. These symbols are the most well-known group of Buddhist symbols and are traditionally listed in the order of:
    A white parasol
    A pair of golden fishes
    A treasure vase
    A lotus
    A right-spiraling white conch shell
    An endless knot or ‘lucky diagram’
    A victorious banner
    A golden wheel

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  • Asthamangala (chatra)

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    Chatra is also a celestial being, yidam, and ishta-devata. In different Dharmic traditions, it is an apparatus of chakravartin. A number of goddesses are portrayed with chatra, and they include Revanta, Surya, and Vishnu. The chatra is close off amongst the symbols that approach comprehensiveness within sets of Ashtamangala, e.g., in the Digambar Jain tradition, and the Vajrayana tradition.

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  • Asthamangala Dharma chakra Wheel

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    The Dharma chakra wheel consists of a hub, rim, and generally eight spokes, although sometimes more are portrayed. The circle as its underlying form is a general symbol found in all cultures. The most renown form of the wheel belongs to the Eight Symbols. It is interpreted as the wheel of Dharma, which the Buddha set in motion with his first discussion. Accordingly, in Buddhism, there are various explanations of its significance. One of these description makes reference to the three trainings of Buddhist practice i.e. the hub stands for the training in moral discipline, through which the mind is supported and balanced, the spokes stand for the application of wisdom in view to emptiness, which cuts off ignorance and the rim indicates training in concentration, which holds the practice together.

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  • Asthamangala Fish

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    This symbol is composed of two fishes, which usually look vertically, parallel or slightly crossed, and heads down and turned towards each other. During the second or third century A.D., they were kept on clay vessels as symbols of good fortune, eventually discovering their way into the traditions of Jainism and Buddhism. In Tibet, they became absorbed as one of the Asthamangala.

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  • Asthamangala Flag

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    The Victory Sign represents the victory of knowledge over ignorance or the victory over all hindrances. In other words, it is the achievement of happiness. The victory sign can be kept as a hanging ornament in temples, as the final of the long prayer-flag masts, and as an allot of certain goddesses, such as Vaisravana, the guardian of wealth.

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  • Asthamangala Kalasa

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    The vase has a short, slim neck which is a fat-bellied vessel. The top opening is formed by a turned-down, broad and decorated rim. The base of the vase is a round stand and is also decorated. On top, at the opening of the vase, there is a large jewel which specifies that it is a treasure vase. The special form of the treasure vase seen in Ashtamangala is a sign of the fulfillment of spiritual and material wishes. It is also associated with particular goddesses who are connected with wealth, such as Kubera and Kangwa Sangpo, one of the companions of Vaishravana.

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  • Asthamangala Lotus

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    The lotus is wholly one of the well-known symbols. It is considered to be a symbol of purity, especially mental purity. Although it has its roots in the mud of ponds and lakes, the flower is built in clean beauty above the surface of the water. Only the lotus, owing to the strength of its stem, repeatedly rises eight to twelve inches above the surface.

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  • Asthamangala Nagpaas

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    The endless knot is a closed, graphic ornament collected of right-angled, interlace lines. In its previous form, it appears as a symbol called “naga” with two stylized snakes. Eventually, it progresses into the endless knot, which has also been described as the “love knot.” For Tibetans, the interlace of lines depicts how all occurrences are interlaced and dependent on causes and conditions. A knot is a form of a pattern with no gaps or breaks, which once expresses motion and rest in a symbolic form of great simplicity and fully balanced harmony. The endless knot is one of the favorite symbols in the culture of Tibetan.

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  • Asthamangala Sankha

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    The conch is known as a white shell that consists of good size, spiral, and oval with pointed ends. The right-turning form is rarer than the left turning form, therefore it is considered as more valuable. Among Ashtamangala, the conch stands for the renown of the Buddha’s teaching, which unrolls in all directions like its sound. Thus, the conch has a great religious significance.

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  • Asthamangala Umbrella

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    Chatra is also a celestial being, yidam, and ishta-devata. In different Dharmic traditions, it is an apparatus of chakravartin. A number of goddesses are portrayed with chatra, and they include Revanta, Surya, and Vishnu. The chatra is close off amongst the symbols that approach comprehensiveness within sets of Ashtamangala, e.g., in the Digambar Jain tradition, and the Vajrayana tradition.

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